David Gilmour - the session musician

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Peter Harold
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David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by Peter Harold » Wed Dec 28, 2016 10:44 pm

I read somewere a debate between two opponents, one stating that it was a miracle that the famous star of Pink Floyd, Mr David Gilmour, had lend a hand to The Orb to record an album; while his (or her?) opponent stated that this Orb album should be considered as a David Gilmour solo album. Well, it is just my opoinion, but why else did I bought that record...? ;-)

Anyway, it may be magic when Mr Gilmour walks into the studio a session musician. But it is not a miracle. What would be the worth of Paul McCartney's "No more lonely nights" without the amazing guitar solo it closes with? Or "You never listen to me" by Peter Cetera. My favorite when Gilmour support other artists is "Standing round crying" that Paul Rodgers recorded on his tribute album for Muddy Waters.

To make a bridge to the clip I would like to show here, I would mention that the album with The Orb was sure not Mr Gilmour's first meeting with the electronica music. Perhaps not even Alan Parson's "Return to Tunguska" may be considered as the first example of such meeting, but sure a favorite for everyone that call himself a Pink Floyd fan (as a matter of fact, I really wish there would be a real Gilmour-Parson album). On the track of Alan's solo album, Mr Gilmour played his famous pedal steel guitar. And this is not the first time we hear Mr Gilmour on that instrument, nor is it a first time Mr Gilmour slides the tones on any else's record in this fashion. Here is an early example of his talent, this one with the band Sutherland Brothers and Quiver, on their single "Aint to proud" from 1975. Two other band members worth to notice was Tim Renwick and Willie Wilson. I don't think none of them need any introduction for readers at this forum.

Shine on, Peter


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Re: David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by twcc » Wed Dec 28, 2016 11:07 pm

^^^
http ... not https


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Peter Harold
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Re: David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by Peter Harold » Thu Mar 09, 2017 7:42 pm

" Wow, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd is playiing jazz!" shouted the young fan when listening to the 8th track of the album "Rattle that lock", the so far latest solo album by Mr Gilmour. And indeed, "The girl with the yellow dress" has sure an air of jazz. pastish jazz. But the one that got surprised by Gilmour tuning into jazz hasn't put any proper attention to previous expeditions into this part of the musical world.

We can go back to the beginning of last dacade; Mr Gilmour had been called by Mr Robert Wyatt in 2001, the former hero of Soft Machine and a stream of jazzy solo albums, and asked to perform at Wyatt's Meltdown festivale. As in the phone, Mr Gilmour got the idea of using a chamber orchestra, when performing Pink Floyd music and some of his personal favorite songs by other composers. This was eventually released the following year as the DVD "David Gilmour In Concert". This was an opportunity fo have Mr Wyatt as a guest.

The story didn't ended there. While this was the return of Gilmour as a solo artist, he same was the fact about Mr Wyatt. In 2003 he released his 8th solo album, "Cuckooland". This album is recorded with the helping hands of Karen Mantler, daughter of the couple Mike Mantler and Carla Bley; the latter the one who gave a away a solo album to be branded as "Nick Mason's Fictious Sports" for commercial reasons. Other musicians are Annie Whitehead on trombone (another Carla Bley- corlaborator), Jamie Johnson on bass guitar, Phil Manzanera and Brian Eno on vocals, Paul Weller on guitar, and Gilad Atzmon who many years later would replace Dick Parry on saxophone in Pink Floyd. And speaking about Pink Floyd, we have also a guest contribution from Mr David Gilmour at the track "Forest"!



How much jazz would we rate this as? Well, it is sure that Gilmour has tuned his guitar to this a little bit dry sound that he seems to have been fond of ever since this time, losing the feel of space travel. There is also a lap pedal steel guitar filling in here and there, but in all the guitar playing never goes beyond any limits that is approriate to the Wyatt formula. Well, even if that actually would bring a lot of freedom to any musician... ;-)

Shine on, Peter

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Re: David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by DarkSideFreak » Sat Mar 11, 2017 9:40 pm

I love his solo on Supertramp's "Brother Where You Bound". It's an amazing track even without him, but those last couple of minutes... just wow.

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Re: David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by Peter Harold » Mon Feb 19, 2018 9:07 pm

Yes, I know. I will be smacked in my face, but I have honestly never ever liked Rolling Stones. Thanks to Mick Jagger. Well, I do have a favroite R.S.-track, and that is an instrumental from the 60-ies, which is pretty psychedelic. I have forgotten the title, and I suppose any hardcore Rolling Stone-fan would not like to suggest which song this could be after my attack here...

I was informed recently that the namned Mick Jagger also have a talented daughter (it was actually my own daughter giving me this inormation...) that does not sing. Thanks heaven! " - And he has a brother... that sings!" Oh... gosh. Is that really true? Well, bad accident does comes on two, or what they say. Could it be this... hm... Chris Jagger? Yes. But wait a minute... yes, a short check up up on the Google. Yes, indeed. It is the very same Chris Jagger that got a Mr. David Gilmour to record a guitar track on his solo album. And Gilmour is good.

I have chosen the track "Junkman" because it does shows how an early example of the sound he approached for the above shown "The girl in the yellow dress", which was - in fact if I am correct - a demo song when "On an island" was recorded.

Anyway, here is is:


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Re: David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by Jezebelly » Mon Mar 05, 2018 3:02 am

(really great thread!)

Also, he sat in as a session musician, (as well as producer) with The Dream Academy in the 80s.

And I'm unclear if Gilmour actually recorded any of the tracks of Willow Robinson's debut album, but here's a link to them jamming recently. It's a pretty good album, actually.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGsfindJHMc

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Re: David Gilmour - the session musician

Post by Peter Harold » Wed Nov 14, 2018 11:20 pm

Today, it is not "David Gilmour - the session musician" I am talking about. Today I give you "David Gilmour - the backing singer".

Here is the 3rd track of Kate Bush' 1982 release, the song "Pull out the pin" from the album "The Dreaming". We could say it is an interesting album even if we would judge it from the list of musicians: Geoff Downes on trumpet (Yes, the Asia keyboardist makes a Rick Wright and blow in the brass!); Ian Bairnson leaves a guitar tune; the creator of "Riverdance" Bill Whelan; the everywere present drummer Stuart Elliot; the heavy metal bass player Jimmy Bain (who passed away two years ago), and many more.

And there is Mr. David Gilmour, performing as backing singer to this experimental song about the war in Vietnam. Mr Gilmour does sounds a liitle bit... "goofy"?

Well, enjoy, ladies and gentlemen!