Pink Floyd - The Wall

Discussions about Pink Floyd and Solo Official Album CDs and DVDs.

Rate This Album

5 - Best
65
56%
4
27
23%
3
13
11%
2
5
4%
1 - Worst
7
6%
 
Total votes: 117

User avatar
Hudini
Supreme Lord!
Supreme Lord!
Posts: 5787
Joined: Mon Apr 09, 2007 1:53 pm
Gender: Male
Location: Rattle That Lock... Baby!

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by Hudini » Mon Jul 11, 2011 7:22 am

mosespa wrote:I think Thriller is a great album. *shrug*
It's a matter of a personal opinion, really. Per instance, I think that "Awake" is the best album Dream Theater made, while a lot of people, including some band members, regard it as rubbish. I'm fine with that.

But the fact is that sales figures are not an indicator of a greatness of an album. I've just googled some lists of best selling albums of all time and it appears that some album dubbed "Millennium" recorded by Backstreet Boys had sold some 10 million copies more than "Sgt. Pepper" or Led Zeppelin's fourth album. Does that mean it's a way better album than those two? Dunno. Probably is, from a point of view of a Backstreet Boys fan. Not by any chance from my point of view. :smt102

User avatar
danielcaux
Supreme Judge!
Supreme Judge!
Posts: 2546
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 1:25 am
Location: Abya Yala

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by danielcaux » Sat Jul 16, 2011 11:21 pm

There's a big difference between quality and popularity. Americans tend to confuse the two quite a lot --not talking about mosespa at all but U.S.Americans in general. They are obsessed with "success", it seems to me that the purpouse of life for most of them is to achieve "success", and "success" for them equals money and fame, recognition and validation. So a good album is a profitable one, the bigger the better, and hence they think that if something is not popular then it can't be good at all.

Well I really don't know if that's how most americans think, but that's the impression I get when watching their media. They seem to think Jay Z is the best rapper, and why? Because he is the richest, simple. Same goes with all the other pop idols and movie stars. I wonder what would they think of Van Gogh had he lived in the present time? Poor pathetic broke-ass loser who didn't know how to draw? Probably. But since he became famous after his death, now they think he is one of the best artist in history, not because they know or really understand and appreciate his work, but because he has been validated by mainstream historians, artists and critics. It's kind of a herd mentality.

But you know, I don't blame them, at least popularity is an objective thing than CAN be measured and compared, but how the hell do you measure quality?

User avatar
mosespa
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 11186
Joined: Thu Sep 12, 2002 5:54 pm
Location: In the editing bay...working on the final cut...

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by mosespa » Sun Jul 17, 2011 7:55 am

danielcaux wrote: but how the hell do you measure quality?
A guy named Robert Persig tried to figure that out...and it broke his mind.

Check out "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance" for more info.

User avatar
pastchristmas
Blade
Blade
Posts: 114
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 12:36 pm

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by pastchristmas » Mon Jul 18, 2011 9:16 am

Whenever I recommend The Wall to anyone, I always make sure to add the suggestion that they not judge it on one listen. It is an acquired taste for most people (including me) and it might take some time to lock into.

I heard the album once when a girlfriend made me listen to it, and I didn't like it at first. It's a good thing that I did not leave it at just that, but ended up revisiting the album some years later. Now, it remains one of my favorites and, in my humble opinion, one of the greatest albums ever made. I've gotta give it a "5"

User avatar
J Ed
Supreme Lord!
Supreme Lord!
Posts: 5133
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 2:36 am
Location: in a midwestern-type autoplant town, waiting for the autopocalypse to come

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by J Ed » Tue Jul 26, 2011 10:36 pm

The Wall was the first Floyd album I ever heard
recommended to me by my high school psychologist, my interest was piqued by the Gerald Scarfe cartoon promoting the single
I didnt even like rocknroll before I heard it, I thought the music kids my age listened to was for and by antiintellectual neanderthals
The Wall I could get into because it worked like a novel or a film
I never knew rocknroll could have a narrative, that the album could be a unified cohesive story rather than a collection of stoopid singles and stoopider filler, or that all elements of the album including even the labels and the sticker on the shrinkwrap could add layers of meaning to that story

musically first thing I dug was the soundcollages and for years that was my favoruite element in any of their music, and gave me a taste in subsequent years for things like Negativland, John Zorn and Public Enemy, who were also very clever with the soundcollages

I saw the film a lot when it came out, usally after a nice spliffy but thankfuly never dosed
havent seen it in decades and the dvd is one of the few items in the floyd catalog I do not own
at this stage in life I just can not endure all that blood and selfpity, which is how I remember it

I must add I was lucky enough to see Rogers 1990 Berlin performance of The Wall, from mere metres away from the stage too: Roger was tapdancing within shouting distance though I dont think he could hear me shouting at him "just wing it dude! improvise something! play Seamus, play fucking anything!!"

User avatar
drafsack
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 4211
Joined: Fri Jun 21, 2002 7:53 am
Location: Krud City

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by drafsack » Wed Jul 27, 2011 10:18 pm

pastchristmas wrote: I heard the album once when a girlfriend made me listen to it, and I didn't like it at first. It's a good thing that I did not leave it at just that, but ended up revisiting the album some years later. Now, it remains one of my favorites and, in my humble opinion, one of the greatest albums ever made. I've gotta give it a "5"
We would all like to think you gave your girlfriend 1 for making the suggestion

User avatar
Enish
Knife
Knife
Posts: 429
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:02 pm
Gender: Female
Location: United States

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by Enish » Fri Aug 05, 2011 8:26 pm

Probably my favorite Floyd album. This album is a complete experience from start to finish. People can call it angsty and self-indulgent all they want. If a piece of music can open up wounds from my past, then it's done a good job. I may not like Roger Waters as much as a lot of other Floyd fans might, but I will always respect him for creating this rock masterpiece. 5/5

User avatar
pastchristmas
Blade
Blade
Posts: 114
Joined: Wed Jul 13, 2011 12:36 pm

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by pastchristmas » Fri Aug 05, 2011 11:33 pm

drafsack wrote:
pastchristmas wrote: I heard the album once when a girlfriend made me listen to it, and I didn't like it at first. It's a good thing that I did not leave it at just that, but ended up revisiting the album some years later. Now, it remains one of my favorites and, in my humble opinion, one of the greatest albums ever made. I've gotta give it a "5"
We would all like to think you gave your girlfriend 1 for making the suggestion
Indeed! In retrospect, turning me on to the Floyd was the only thing she was ever good for. :lol:

User avatar
Jack Wolf
Axe
Axe
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun May 31, 2009 3:41 pm

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by Jack Wolf » Sat Aug 13, 2011 1:23 am

J Ed wrote:The Wall was the first Floyd album I ever heard
recommended to me by my high school psychologist,
:lol:
So what's the story behind that? Why would your HS psychologist recommend it?

All in all, I'd say The Wall is Floyd's greatest work and one of the greatest albums of all time.

User avatar
J Ed
Supreme Lord!
Supreme Lord!
Posts: 5133
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 2:36 am
Location: in a midwestern-type autoplant town, waiting for the autopocalypse to come

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by J Ed » Sat Aug 13, 2011 3:47 am

I think he was just trying to relate to teenagers by talking about about music, seems an obvious enough strategy
ironic thing was I didnt even like rocknroll, he was kind of trying the wrong approach to reach me, but he sure made that record sound good
he specifically mentioned the helicopter effect, then got into a tangent about Apocalypse Now which I had seen, and I got to skip a boring class and talk to the school shrink about cool movies for an hour
then he told me the singer in the band lived in a castle and wouldnt let anybody in, and would smash a dozen teevees on stage each night as part of the concert .... too bad Roger never really did that but it took me decades to find that out (thanks to the muchbootlegged 1980 proshot film)

same psychiatrist also told me about the song Bohemian Rhapsody and made that sound interesting too, enough that I went out and bought both those records
he may not have cured me, but those attempts to communicate helped make me a music fan for life

User avatar
Idisaffect
Judge!
Judge!
Posts: 2039
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 8:20 am
Gender: Male
Location: here now

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by Idisaffect » Sat Aug 13, 2011 4:50 pm

J Ed wrote:he specifically mentioned the helicopter effect, then got into a tangent about Apocalypse Now which I had seen, and I got to skip a boring class and talk to the school shrink about cool movies for an hour.
In the town it was well known when he got home at night his fat and psychopathic wife would thrash him within inches of his life.

User avatar
thefinalcut
Hammer
Hammer
Posts: 836
Joined: Fri Mar 11, 2005 7:57 pm
Gender: Female
Location: Argentina

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by thefinalcut » Sun Aug 21, 2011 1:36 am

Eclipse wrote:My two favorite bands released two amazing rock-operas as double albums: PF and Genesis <ii>

And i listen to them over and over, and never get bored!
Those albums you mentioned (The Wall and The Lamb Lies Down On Broadway) are both my all time favorite Rock operas as well !

User avatar
J Ed
Supreme Lord!
Supreme Lord!
Posts: 5133
Joined: Tue May 11, 2004 2:36 am
Location: in a midwestern-type autoplant town, waiting for the autopocalypse to come

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by J Ed » Mon Aug 29, 2011 10:38 pm

here is that original promo film for Another Brick in the Wall
I first saw on Don Kirschners Rock Concert while waiting for Saturday Night Live to come on
it persuaded me to buy the album thanks to its paranoid dystopic imagery and weird cartoon stylings

one more thing about The Wall:
at the time none of my friends was aware there had been a tour
we didnt figure it out for years
the Floyd in fact had not played Toronto since 1973 and nobody we knew had ever seen them
we figured they must be a studio band, like the late Beatles, because how could anybody replicate all those sound effects on stage

it wasnt til I went to art school and started hanging with folks few years older than myself I met several people who'd actually, as teenagers, travelled to New York just to see The Wall live

User avatar
Jack Wolf
Axe
Axe
Posts: 69
Joined: Sun May 31, 2009 3:41 pm

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by Jack Wolf » Wed Sep 07, 2011 9:23 pm

The Wall

Part One

1. Hey You: As of right now, this is my favorite Floyd song and also the best song on this entire album. Musically it's very striking with a grim ambience that adds to the foreboding mood. - 10
2. Is There Anybody Out There?: A somewhat omnious and atmospheric track. The guitar melody in the second half really adds to the creeping tone of the song. - 9
3. Nobody Home: "I got thirteen channels of shit on the TV to choose from." Just awesome! - 9
4. Vera: A solid piece with a nice melody. - 8
5. Bring The Boys Back Home: Not much to say about this track. It pales in comparison to the song that comes after it. Still decent.- 7
6. Comfortably Numb: A Pink Floyd classic! Positively one of their most outstanding songs. A majestic masterpiece and a narcotic for the ears. - 10
7. The Show Must Go On: I really enjoyed the chorus on this track. A short but sweet song. - 8.5
8. In The Flesh: When I think of "The Wall", I immediately hear the music from this song playing in my head. Supreme excellence! - 10
9. Run Like Hell: Another incredible song, great music throughout. - 9
10: Waiting For The Worms: A fine tune, but the intercom voice thingy was a bit over-the-top. Still great. - 8
11. Stop: Just alright. - 7
12. The Trial: A whimsical and Disney-ish sounding piece of musical theater. Very cool. - 8.5
13. Outside The Wall: A nice and slow reflective song to end the album with...but wait...no, this isn't the end! - 9

Part One = 8.7

Part Two

1. In The Flesh? The music carries on from "Outside The Wall" into this track. This can only mean one thing...this is in fact the 2nd part of the album, not the first! This track was a great way to start off the second half of the album. I love that unmistakable guitar riff. - 9
2. The Thin Ice: A good song. I liked the melodious lullaby of the first half better than the second half. - 8
3. Another Brick In The Wall, Pt. 1: This was a magnificent track, with great lyrics too. - 9.5
4. The Happiest Days of Our Lives: "Their fat psychopathic wives would thrash them within inches of their lives." Gotta love those lyrics! - 8.5
5. Another Brick In The Wall, Pt. 2: Probably the best track on the second half of the album. Very original song, and the children's chorus was just brilliant. - 10
6. Mother: "Mother, did it need to be so high?" Let me correct myself, this is the best song on this half of the album. - 10
7. Goodbye Blue Sky: Fantastic song with a beautiful melody; hypnotically wonderful, but too damn short! - 10
8. Empty Spaces: A dark and atmospheric track that's very riveting, but like the song before it, it seems too short. - 8.5
9. Young Lust: This is altogether a superb rock song. Oddly enough, this might actually be the most uplifting song on the entire album. - 8
10. One of My Turns: A hard hitting and crazy theatrical song, like a violent soap opera. - 9
11. Don't Leave Me Now: Love the guitar and keyboard playing toward the end of this song. Just good music with some dark overtones. - 9
12. Another Brick In The Wall, Pt. 3: Re-emphasizing the point that it was "all just bricks in the wall." - 7
13. Goodbye Cruel World: A very dark but effective way to end the album, and boy what an album it is! - 8

Part Two = 8.8

Album Artwork: The album cover is simple but effective, it's a wall after all! The interior artwork on the gatefold sleeves, showing the various vignettes within the wall, was very well done. Superb!. - 9

Final Score: 9.8 (out of 10) - I added an entire 1.0 bonus point to the average score because this album is so friggin amazing!

Final word: This is Pink Floyd's best album, period. There is no other musical experience that quite compares to this. This is more than music, this is a complete auditory experience! This album has the perfect blend of rock music, theatrics, soundscapes and Roger Water's sometimes odd lyrics. This is musical brilliance.

A short note: Although the two sides of the album are labeled Parts 1 and 2 or Side A, Side B, it is quite apparent to me that Side B should come first, at least in my opinion. The album is far more effective this way. The music from "Outside The Wall" continues on into "In The Flesh?". This represents a shift, when Pink begins to reflect back upon his childhood and the circumstances that led to his predicament. Side A is merely a past reflection of how "the wall" started to get built, but the final track on Side A is in the present moment where Pink Floyd commits suicide in "Goodbye Cruel World" to finally end the album. This album pretty much spelled the eventual end for Pink Floyd, as the band members started going their separate ways, so it is actually quite fitting. Of course, listening to the album the traditional way will leave you with a more positive ending, so it's really up to you.

User avatar
danielcaux
Supreme Judge!
Supreme Judge!
Posts: 2546
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2007 1:25 am
Location: Abya Yala

Re: Pink Floyd - The Wall

Post by danielcaux » Wed Sep 07, 2011 10:26 pm

Good one! :lol:

But having the discs reversed would deprive the album of its natural flow and tension building process, and would hinder the emotinal impact some of the songs in disc 2 achieve if the listener is alraeady familiarized with the narrative that goes on disc 1. There's no need to reversed the order of the discs; disc 1 already opens in mid-res with In The Flesh and then flashbacks to Pink's important moments in life, explaing what got him into creating the wall and all that. Disc 2 then shows how he internally deals with the psychological aftermath and how to some degree he resolves the conflict, at the risk of falling down and repeating the cycle all over again, which is what the split "When we ...came in" wants to imply, I believe.

Just listening to disc 2 out of the blue, without the context given in disc 1, would leave must listeners just scratching their heads and having "I don't give a f--k about this man" reactions. Storywise.

And what would be Pink reflecting about after Outside The Wall? Outside The Wall is the conclusion at which Pink arrives after passing through the ordeal of The Trial; and The Trial prosecutor's case is built upon everything that happens on disc 1. So why recall all that again just after it had been brought up and dealt with one song ago?